SUCH A FUN AGE

This book was a thrill. WELL worth the hype…don’t be fooled by the bright, colorful cover. This was exhilarating, eye-opening, and a wonderfully empathetic social commentary about race, the complicated reality of adulthood, and the consequences of misguided and naive actions with the intention of “doing the right thing.”

I read this book for my bookclub at work, which funnily enough, happens to be the agency where Kiley Reid is represented – William Morris Endeavor. It is such a joy to not only be able to read wonderful books like this, but I also to work at a company that helped her bring this story out into the world. Stand by for edits to this post with comments from what we discuss today!

Set in 2015, Such A Fun Age revolves around a young black babysitter, her well-intentioned white employer, and the events that ensue in the wake of a racist confrontation at a grocery store. This book had so many twists and turns that I did not expect, I was truly kept on the edge of my seat. Moreover, Reid’s breezy narration kept this a real page-turner, and an excellent pick for any reader.

This was simply put, a FUN read! I found myself rooting for each and every one of Reid’s characters, while simultaneously being aggravated with all of them. I laughed a lot. Briar was an adorably-written three-year-old. Alix was…a trip, to say the least. And Emira is the level of chill that I strive to be, but know I will never reach. I wasn’t such a fan of Kelley, but mainly because he reminds me of some I, too, dated in high school (ick, right???) So that goes to say — Reid did a beautiful job of writing such delightfully funny, annoying, and relatable characters. And the awkward, cringe-worthy encounters they get themselves into. I saw a sliver of myself in each character.

But beneath the humor and the awkwardness of it all is a fierce social commentary. Reid’s lovely narrative allowed me (and I’m sure many other readers) to grapple with and re-evaluate my own perceptions of race, of friendships, of family, and of adulthood — but in a way that is refreshing, compassionate and piercing in every way.

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